Rosie supports Veterans Aid, a charity that has been providing practical help to veterans in crises since 1932. Its unique pathway from welfare to wellbeing has turned around the lives of hundreds of ex-servicemen and women in trouble.

Rosie has particular empathy with those suffering from the after-effects of conflict. She says, “After my own return from being alone on the frozen Arctic Ocean, and experiencing the terror of its violence, cruelty and unpredictability, I often felt as though I was in a war zone and it took a long time to recover psychologically. My experiences aren’t comparable to those of war veterans, but I can relate to them.”

Veterans’ aid system has won much respect for its high success rate.

First actions might be the provision of food, new clothing and shelter., followed when needed, by prolonged periods of counselling, drink/drug rehabilitation and medical treatment.

Further support frequently involves education, retraining or the acquisition of a new skill. Then help is given to identify employment opportunities and, when they are deemed ready, individuals are helped to move into new homes – furnished and decorated by Veterans Aid.